Orient, train and equip prior to departure

Orient, train and equip prior to departure

Pre-travel medical information should be provided for all international travelers and assignees (and dependents) as well as training and medical kits for those working in high-risk locations.

Leveraging technology such as online training tools and automated emails can maximize the opportunity to effectively prepare personnel.

Recommended Action

  • Prepare employees and their dependents by informing them of predictable health risks and options for mitigation.
  • First aid training and travel kits should be considered for all traveling employees, not just those going to remote locations or areas with limited medical care.

 

Additional Resources

 

 

Polling Results

  • Business travelers are typically more educated on the risks associated with their travel more so than international assignees.
  • 68-percent report providing a briefing to their business travelers on health risks and prevention prior to the start of their travel and nearly the same percentage offer their travelers a medical consultation.
  • 48-percent provide their international assignees with an orientation program to educate them on local health resources and risks prior to deployment.
  • More companies provide first aid travel kits than offer first aid training.
  • 15-percent or less of the companies indicated that they offered first aid training for their international assignees or travelers.
  • 26-percent offered training for employees in high-risk or medically underserved locations.
  • 80-percent of large companies (25,000 or more working outside the US.) offer medical kits to their international travelers.
  • 34-percent of respondents use e-Learning to educate employees about health in remote locations.

Council Commentary

The Council believes that there is significant opportunity for improvement as many companies still do not effectively orient and train their internationally mobile personnel, nor offer first aid training and travel kits. In high-risk environments, training and kits may make the difference between life and death and must be considered a standard.

Council Commentary